Image-guided Radiation Therapy

Image-Guided Radiation

Therapy

Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is the

use of imaging during radiation therapy to improve

the precision and accuracy of treatment delivery.

How Does Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Work?

Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is the use of imaging during radiation therapy to improve the precision and accuracy of treatment delivery.

IGRT is used when treating tumours in areas of the body that move, such as the lungs. Radiation therapy equipment when used with imaging technology allows the radiographer to image the tumour before and during your treatment. By comparing treatment images to the images taken during treatment planning, the radiation beams may be adjusted to more precisely target the radiation dose to the tumour. To help line up and target the equipment, some IGRT procedures may use ultrasound, MRI, X-Ray images, CT scans, 3-D body surface mapping, or coloured ink markers on the skin.

If you undergo IGRT, your doctor will often use CT scanning to create reference images and to carry out a treatment simulation session. Other imaging procedures, such as a PET or MRI scan, may be used to help clarify the exact shape and location of your tumour, with a special device sometimes being created to help you maintain your exact position during each treatment.

Other Types of Radiotherapy Treatment

External beam radiation

Types of external beam radiotherapy include:

  • Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT)
  • Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT)
  • Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR)

External beam radiotherapy is non-invasive and is delivered from outside the body by a machine called a linear accelerator (or linac) that targets a focused beam of X-rays directly at the tumour area. The procedure is completely painless, although patients are required to remain completely still throughout.  Treatment takes only a few minutes and is usually given each day, but not at weekends.

At the Clatterbridge Private Clinic we have access to the latest generation of world-class radiotherapy machines, such as the Varian TrueBeam™.  The machine can deliver VMAT (Volumetric Arc Therapy) which is the most advance form of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) that wraps the radiation tightly around the target tumour, minimising damage to surrounding healthy tissue. The pinpoint accuracy and precision of the machine also allows faster delivery of the therapy and quicker treatment times.

External beam radiation

Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapies are a method of delivering radiotherapy by targeting accurately, specific cancers. This form of treatment is not for everyone, generally people with smaller cancers receive this, and isn’t available in all hospitals in the UK, but it is here at Clatterbridge Private Clinic.

SABR and ordinary radiotherapy differ, in that traditional radiotherapy delivers a beam of radiation to the treatment area given in low, daily doses over a number of weeks. SABR uses thin, angled beams of radiation designed to intersect at the tumour. The tumour obtains a high dose of radiation, while the nearby healthy tissue receives a low dose, reducing the risk of harm to normal cells around the tumour. It can be administered using fewer treatment sessions compared with standard radiotherapy, normally separated into between one and eight sessions. These sessions are spread over a number of days and could take up to a fortnight to complete.

External beam radiation
  • Prostate Brachytherapy
  • Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer
  • Papillion Treatment for Rectal Tumours
  • Orthovoltage Skin Treatment
External beam radiation

Brachytherapy treats cancer with radiation delivered from inside the body. This may involve implanting radiation directly into the tumour, or placing a radiation source close to it for a predetermined length of time.

Brachytherapy is frequently used as an effective treatment for cervical, prostate, breast, and skin cancers but can also be used to treat tumours in many other areas. Results have shown that the cancer-cure rates for brachytherapy are either; comparable to surgery and external beam radiotherapy or are improved when used in conjunction with these therapies. Brachytherapy can be used as a standalone treatment or in combination with other therapies such as EBRT and chemotherapy.

Clatterbridge Private Clinic offers brachytherapy for prostate and gynaecological cancers, and a specialised form of brachytherapy called Papillon Therapy for rectal cancer.

Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer (cancers of the endometrium (womb) or cervix) uses a high dose of radiotherapy centred directly on the tumour, with a low dose given to surrounding tissues that are normal. Brachytherapy is used mainly to treat cervical and womb cancers as well as in the prostate gland.

Brachytherapy for cervical or womb cancer is given through applicators, special hollow tubes inserted into the womb or vagina. A machine is then used to place the radioactive material inside the applicators and are withdrawn back into the machine and the applicators are removed when the treatment has finished. Occasionally, additional applicators may be used to boost the dose of radiotherapy to a specific area.

Brachytherapy can be given as either a high-dose or low dose, the same dose (amount of radiotherapy) can be given in one treatment or over a course of treatment at different times. High-dose rate treatment is given over a short period of time (10–15 minutes) as one short burst or several short bursts over a number of days.

Low-dose rate treatment is given over a longer period, often over 12–24 hours.

Special precautions are taken to prevent other people being exposed to radioactivity while the machine is giving you your treatment and the Clatterbridge Private Clinic team will give you more information about these precautions.

External beam radiation

Brachytherapy treats cancer with radiation delivered from inside the body. This may involve implanting radiation directly into the tumour, or placing a radiation source close to it for a predetermined length of time.

Brachytherapy is frequently used as an effective treatment for cervical, prostate, breast, and skin cancers but can also be used to treat tumours in many other areas. Results have shown that the cancer-cure rates for brachytherapy are either; comparable to surgery and external beam radiotherapy or are improved when used in conjunction with these therapies. Brachytherapy can be used as a standalone treatment or in combination with other therapies such as EBRT and chemotherapy.

Clatterbridge Private Clinic offers brachytherapy for prostate and gynaecological cancers, and a specialised form of brachytherapy called Papillon Therapy for rectal cancer.

There are two methods of giving brachytherapy for prostate cancer; at The Clatterbridge Private Clinic we offer high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Highdose rate brachytherapy

High-dose rate brachytherapy, involves inserting thin plastic or metal tubes into the prostate and radioactive material is then inserted into the tubes through a machine. The radioactive material is left in the tubes for a set time period and then taken out. When the treatment has finished, the tubes are removed with no radioactive material left in the prostate gland.

External Beam Radiotherapy
External beam radiation

Types of external beam radiotherapy include:

  • Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT)
  • Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT)
  • Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR)

External beam radiotherapy is non-invasive and is delivered from outside the body by a machine called a linear accelerator (or linac) that targets a focused beam of X-rays directly at the tumour area. The procedure is completely painless, although patients are required to remain completely still throughout.  Treatment takes only a few minutes and is usually given each day, but not at weekends.

At the Clatterbridge Private Clinic we have access to the latest generation of world-class radiotherapy machines, such as the Varian TrueBeam™.  The machine can deliver VMAT (Volumetric Arc Therapy) which is the most advance form of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) that wraps the radiation tightly around the target tumour, minimising damage to surrounding healthy tissue. The pinpoint accuracy and precision of the machine also allows faster delivery of the therapy and quicker treatment times.

Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy
External beam radiation

Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapies are a method of delivering radiotherapy by targeting accurately, specific cancers. This form of treatment is not for everyone, generally people with smaller cancers receive this, and isn’t available in all hospitals in the UK, but it is here at Clatterbridge Private Clinic.

SABR and ordinary radiotherapy differ, in that traditional radiotherapy delivers a beam of radiation to the treatment area given in low, daily doses over a number of weeks. SABR uses thin, angled beams of radiation designed to intersect at the tumour. The tumour obtains a high dose of radiation, while the nearby healthy tissue receives a low dose, reducing the risk of harm to normal cells around the tumour. It can be administered using fewer treatment sessions compared with standard radiotherapy, normally separated into between one and eight sessions. These sessions are spread over a number of days and could take up to a fortnight to complete.

Radiotherapy given Internally
External beam radiation
  • Prostate Brachytherapy
  • Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer
  • Papillion Treatment for Rectal Tumours
  • Orthovoltage Skin Treatment
Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer
External beam radiation

Brachytherapy treats cancer with radiation delivered from inside the body. This may involve implanting radiation directly into the tumour, or placing a radiation source close to it for a predetermined length of time.

Brachytherapy is frequently used as an effective treatment for cervical, prostate, breast, and skin cancers but can also be used to treat tumours in many other areas. Results have shown that the cancer-cure rates for brachytherapy are either; comparable to surgery and external beam radiotherapy or are improved when used in conjunction with these therapies. Brachytherapy can be used as a standalone treatment or in combination with other therapies such as EBRT and chemotherapy.

Clatterbridge Private Clinic offers brachytherapy for prostate and gynaecological cancers, and a specialised form of brachytherapy called Papillon Therapy for rectal cancer.

Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer (cancers of the endometrium (womb) or cervix) uses a high dose of radiotherapy centred directly on the tumour, with a low dose given to surrounding tissues that are normal. Brachytherapy is used mainly to treat cervical and womb cancers as well as in the prostate gland.

Brachytherapy for cervical or womb cancer is given through applicators, special hollow tubes inserted into the womb or vagina. A machine is then used to place the radioactive material inside the applicators and are withdrawn back into the machine and the applicators are removed when the treatment has finished. Occasionally, additional applicators may be used to boost the dose of radiotherapy to a specific area.

Brachytherapy can be given as either a high-dose or low dose, the same dose (amount of radiotherapy) can be given in one treatment or over a course of treatment at different times. High-dose rate treatment is given over a short period of time (10–15 minutes) as one short burst or several short bursts over a number of days.

Low-dose rate treatment is given over a longer period, often over 12–24 hours.

Special precautions are taken to prevent other people being exposed to radioactivity while the machine is giving you your treatment and the Clatterbridge Private Clinic team will give you more information about these precautions.

Prostate Brachytherapy
External beam radiation

Brachytherapy treats cancer with radiation delivered from inside the body. This may involve implanting radiation directly into the tumour, or placing a radiation source close to it for a predetermined length of time.

Brachytherapy is frequently used as an effective treatment for cervical, prostate, breast, and skin cancers but can also be used to treat tumours in many other areas. Results have shown that the cancer-cure rates for brachytherapy are either; comparable to surgery and external beam radiotherapy or are improved when used in conjunction with these therapies. Brachytherapy can be used as a standalone treatment or in combination with other therapies such as EBRT and chemotherapy.

Clatterbridge Private Clinic offers brachytherapy for prostate and gynaecological cancers, and a specialised form of brachytherapy called Papillon Therapy for rectal cancer.

There are two methods of giving brachytherapy for prostate cancer; at The Clatterbridge Private Clinic we offer high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Highdose rate brachytherapy

High-dose rate brachytherapy, involves inserting thin plastic or metal tubes into the prostate and radioactive material is then inserted into the tubes through a machine. The radioactive material is left in the tubes for a set time period and then taken out. When the treatment has finished, the tubes are removed with no radioactive material left in the prostate gland.

FAQ

Q. Will this treatment hurt?
Q. How long will the treatment take?
Q. What side effects can I expect?
Q. Will I be radioactive after the treatment?

Cancers Image-Guided Radiation Therapy can treat

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